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"Creation which cannot express itself becomes madness."

Anaïs Nin

(via louxosenjoyables)

(Source: kerryquotesquotes, via metaconscious)

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jannabelle:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake

"This water is shallow for a lake." *dives in to prove the point. eventually drowns at ~50 feet trying to reach the bottom*

jannabelle:

canoeing in a crystal clear lake

"This water is shallow for a lake." *dives in to prove the point. eventually drowns at ~50 feet trying to reach the bottom*

(Source: sixpenceee)

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(Source: hyyw)

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Playing through the Mass Effect trilogy for the first time. One of my favorite things about it are the diverse star systems and planets you encounter and explore. I forget where this is, but that’s a neat binary star system, an energetic blue star and its red giant partner. (I can’t see the lunar eclipse tonight because of clouds, so I guess I’ll stare at other cosmic things like this. :P)
Another thing I like is that Mako rover. Sonnuva bitch can go anywhere.

Playing through the Mass Effect trilogy for the first time. One of my favorite things about it are the diverse star systems and planets you encounter and explore. I forget where this is, but that’s a neat binary star system, an energetic blue star and its red giant partner. (I can’t see the lunar eclipse tonight because of clouds, so I guess I’ll stare at other cosmic things like this. :P)

Another thing I like is that Mako rover. Sonnuva bitch can go anywhere.

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lucienballard:

'Mobile Lovers'

Banksy’s newest work uploaded to his website.

Photograph: Banksy

(via isoldmysoultofilm)

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"But if we could figure out the trade secrets of photosynthesis? Every other source of energy we depend on today—coal, oil, natural gas—would become obsolete. Photosynthesis is the ultimate green power. It doesn’t pollute the air, and is in fact carbon neutral. Artificial photosynthesis, on a big enough scale, could reduce the greenhouse effect that’s driving climate change in a dangerous direction."

The Atlantic: While you were watching Game of Thrones, Neil deGrasse Tyson shared his solution to global warming

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(Source: m.weheartit.com, via oneiraki)

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theatlantic:

The First Emoticon May Have Appear in … 1648

The discovery would push back the pre-history of the emoticon by (at least) 200 years.
Read more. [Image: Robert Herrick]

theatlantic:

The First Emoticon May Have Appear in … 1648

The discovery would push back the pre-history of the emoticon by (at least) 200 years.

Read more. [Image: Robert Herrick]

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Guardian, Washington Post win Pulitzer for NSA coverage

breakingnews:

USA TODAY: The Guardian and The Washington Post both won a Pulitzer Prize on Monday in the public service category for their coverage of the NSA.

The Boston Globe also won the breaking news prize for its Boston Marathon bombing coverage.

The fiction prize went to Donna Tartt for ‘The Goldfinch.’

This is pretty much the most important or distinguished recognition in journalism. Further validation of Edward Snowden and his important leaks.

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grandefilms:

Memento (2000)

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Egoist Hedonist - Riverside

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…But Hamilton also highlights the good news, which I’d argue is a little bit misguided. He notes that, after the initial “crash,” indigenous populations are often able to recover [after being contacted], and some of the communities have some of the highest growth rates in the world. I’m not calling Hamilton out here—if that’s what the data shows, it’s what it shows. And it’s better that the population “rebounds” rather than dies out completely. But that doesn’t excuse the crash in the first place.

I don’t know that we should be talking about these people’s deaths and their communities’ subsequent recovery as if we’re looking at our stock portfolio. Hamilton notes that “despite the catastrophic mortality of indigenous Amazonians over the 500+ year contact period, the surviving populations are remarkably resilient and remain demographically viable.”

That’s probably what’s running through these people’s minds when they watch their loved ones die: The demographic viability of their community as a whole, as if their imminent “recovery” isn’t one that’s plagued with a forced change in lifestyle, a loss of culture, the utter destruction and pollution of the land that they’ve lived in for lord knows how many years. Their numbers might recover in some cases, but what about what they lost in the process?